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Burak Delier in conversation with Elmas Deniz

Interviews

Published in Art-Unlimited– An intellectual approach to poverty, Dialogues Burak Delier with Elmas Deniz | 2012

NA: Tell me about how you first came into this whole community.

E: First of all, that your point…you said “local identities.” And when it comes to K2, just because of the location of K2—it’s in Izmir, the SW coast of Turkey—3 million people live there, and there’s no CAC or anything. So, it’s a kind of a lacking of space, I mean, a platform, a museum, an anything. That’s the reason K2 really became a multi-functional place: it became a museum of the city, alternative place of the city, and it’s for new artwork...READ MORE


Ulus Atayurt and Pelin Tan with Elmas Deniz

Published in Bir+Bir Magazine– Evine İcra Belgesi Gelmişse, Bir+Bir Dergisi Ulus Atayurt-Pelin Tan with Elmas Deniz | 2012

-Sergide dile getirdiğin fakirlik korkusunu yaşayanlar kim; orta sınıflar mı, sanatçılar mı?

ELMAS DENİZ: Hem kendi içinde olduğum durumdan, hem de genel olarak gözlemlediğim ve aslında fakirliği hiçbir zaman tam olarak deneyimlememiş insanlara musallat olan bir korkudan bahsediyorum. İşleri asarken, galerideki asistan arkadaş ve bir galeri çalışanıyla konuşuyorduk; aslında, gerçekten fakirlik içinde yaşamayı becermiş biri böyle bir korkuyu...READ MORE


Önder Özengi, Burak Delier and Elmas Deniz

This written conversation has been realised for Muhtelif Magazine| 2011

Elmas Deniz: …Along with neo-liberal politics, capitalist forms that are spreading into all domains of life and the reflection of its processes in artistic production, questions about the artist’s position, loss of autonomy and the discrepancy between political action and political production of the artist can be the subjects we can explore here. It might also be interesting to talk about the increasing homogenization of artistic production and its operation with easily acceptable expected models that become more enclosing. Decrease in spaces, in which exceptional production can be presented and discussed, is accompanied by the development of spaces aimed at prestige. These converge with the debility of critique and create a rather problematic sphere. Interestingly enough, in the last years, we are witnessing the emergence of larger /large scale and increasingly more elite art spaces. ...READ MORE


Azra Tüzünoğlu with Elmas Deniz

Happiness, Fear and The science of Statistics , Full Art Prize catalogue Azra Tüzünoğlu with Elmas Deniz | 2012

AT: Lorem ippsum.

ED: Lorem iposum...READ MORE


Elmas Deniz in conversation with Koken Ergun

Published in Who Am I anyway? on the ocassion of Ergun's Exhibition in Kunstlerhause Winthertur, Editor:Oliver Kielmaer|2011

Who am I anyway?

Elmas Deniz: In your works, there’s a common thread I’d like to discuss with you—this is about crowds, communities, and masses. You work on public ceremonies and rituals where there are groups of people, not individuals. In Binibining Promised Land or Wedding, you expose your camera to specific communities. Even in Tanklove, the audience you’re addressing to is residents of a village. Up to now, you have never told a story, never produced a work based on an individual. Can you talk about this decision?

Köken Ergun: There’s actually one work that features an individual: Untitled. I’m the one who performs in this video, yet I’m interested in a group that’s relevant to the issue I’m dealing with. As a performance, I put on different types of headscarves while crying...READ MORE


Nisa Ari with Elmas Deniz

Personal interview for Getting From Here to there Stanford University Program of Art History thesis | 2007

NA: Tell me about how you first came into this whole community.

E: First of all, that your point…you said “local identities.” And when it comes to K2, just because of the location of K2—it’s in Izmir, the SW coast of Turkey—3 million people live there, and there’s no CAC or anything. So, it’s a kind of a lacking of space, I mean, a platform, a museum, an anything. That’s the reason K2 really became a multi-functional place: it became a museum of the city, alternative place of the city, and it’s for new artwork...READ MORE



by Elmas Deniz

Contributions

Art-agenda 13th Istanbul Biennale review “Mom, Am I Barbarian?” | 2013

Curator Fulya Erdemci has said that the focus of the 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, Am I Barbarian?,” is “the notion of the public domain as a political forum.” The evocative title is borrowed from poet Lale Müldür’s eponymous book, with the obvious connotations of a sense of being an ultimate “Other,” one who cannot find a space to freely express him/herself in the above-mentioned public domain, in opposition to the classical notion of a “citizen,” imbued with various rights including the potential to be an actor in the public sphere. The problems of democratic public space, aggressive urban transformation, political engagement, collective living, and what role poetry and art might play in these realms are themes that the biennial orbits around. Given the events in Istanbul over the past few months, these would seem entirely promising and of-the-moment considerations. And yet this year’s biennial has charted its own retreat from Istanbul’s public space, and the contrast between this “within four walls” exhibition—showing eighty-eight international artists in five different venues—and what is going on outside is cacophonous.CONTINUE TO READ from the Second paragraph